Tuesday, July 7, 2015

The Pace of Change is Changing

imageThe only constant is change. This is a saying that has been made over and over again for over a millennia. Why does this statement still hold true today? Because it’s true.

Change is all around us. The difference is that today the pace of change is changing.

The pace of change is accelerating. Never in human history has this been so apparent. Former stalwart axioms, like Moore’s Law, are on the verge of needing to be changed or otherwise updated because they aren’t fast enough.

This is not all a bad thing. It’s just the nature of the beast. Humans has always want to explore, experiment and now as a race humans are working on evolving too. Humans 2.0 is more than just a science fiction title and thought experiment to be carried out by men wearing Nehru Jackets and smoking a meerschaum pipe. Now we are seeing the pace of change in everything from electronics, automobiles and even the way we interact with our fellow humans changing on a monthly (sometimes weekly) basis.

What does this all mean?

It means we need to be ready to adapt. By adapt I mean train, educate and seek to understand what the implications are within the context of the change we will all be seeing. Some will rebel. Some will say it doesn’t fit their worldview. Some will opt-out and “go off the grid” as a way to bypass the changes. The fact is that change is inevitable. Whether it doesn’t fit a particular worldview is irrelevant. Change is coming. Be ready.

There are a lot of changes coming at us from every direction. Medicine, Media and Mechanical devices are being updated on a very regular and dizzying basis. While it’s true that many traditional models of understanding, delivering and being treated by medicine will never change much. For example, treating a wound or caring for individuals, the technology behind each of these is advancing at a rapid rate. The understanding of the biology behind the healing process makes injury management as much about the science as it is about the art. The ability to care for patients is also improving at a rapid rate. Everything from how beds are designed to how the room is optimized for efficiency and efficacy.

That’s just medicine. The transportation industry is being changed at a rapid pace too. Some of the more obvious examples include ride sharing services like Uber and Lyft. Other less obvious, but perhaps more impactful, examples include long haul truckers and the rise of automation for all aspects of their business. The initial elements will be seen in automated trucks that form platoons on the highways to get from city to city with maximum efficiency. Humans will still be involved, for now. Helping these drivers and all the people that support the shipping, logistics and packaging industry aspects of the business will be a job for change management.

Entire industries will be disrupted. Understanding the goals of these disruptions will be just as important as understanding the implications.

Change is inevitable.

Change Management is a Coping Mechanism.

Helping people understand what is coming will be critical to getting their approval to continue disrupting their lives, their business, and their livelihoods. Much like The Terminator in the classic 1984 movie … change will never stop.

Are you ready for the wave of changes that are coming your way?

Image Credit: The Terminator

clip_image001Jeff is an expert in the Enterprise Content Management industry. He brings over 20 years of Channel Sales, Partner Marketing and Alliance expertise to audiences around the world in speaking engagements and via his writing. He has worked for Microsoft, Kodak, and is currently the Chief Evangelist at K2.

Tweet him
@jshuey or connect on LinkedIn, Facebook, or Google+ He is active in the Microsoft Partner Community and is the co-founder and President of the IAMCP Seattle chapter.

He is a contributing author to Entrepreneur, Elite Daily, Yahoo, US News and to the Personal Branding Blog.

Monday, June 29, 2015

Your Car Will Know a LOT about you

imageIn the not too distant future your car will be a lot like your smartphone today.

It will know a lot about you and will give up your secrets when asked. Your car proclivities, like your grocery store purchases, will be catalogued and dissected to give you an ever improving experience.

This is a good thing.

Don’t Fear the Autonomous Car

The future will involve people doing less and less actual driving. Your car will be autonomous. Your car will be connected. Your car will join car platoons of other vehicles as it effortlessly weaves its way around traffic jams and gets you to your destination.

Let’s be clear --- it will NOT likely be YOUR car. Much like Software-as-a-Service we’ll have Vehicles-as-a-Service (VaaS). Of course, Uber and Lyft are pioneering this effort today. But, they are doing it with human drivers. Imagine that same service, on-demand and on-command, except with an automated vehicle.

No longer will we need to pay for a big suburban if all we need it a one or two passenger vehicle. And, when you need that big car – whether it’s a 5 seater or a 25 seater … it will show up on demand and on command.

In the future only the very wealthy (the enthusiasts) and the very poor will drive automobiles.

Your car will know where you go, when you go and how often you go. You wont care how fast the car will get you there. You will only care that it gets you to your destination.

The Docking Port Vehicle

imageA friend I worked with at K2 had an ingenious idea. He suggested that some people might have the equivalent of an Recreational Vehicle (an RV) and the vehicle would “dock” with your house. When you arrived home the unit (which is self-driving and autonomous) would dock, set the seals and allow free access to the house or to the RV unit. There would be no need for a garage or side yard parking area.

Then, when you are ready to go to bed … you sleep in the RV unit. Depending upon where you need to be the next day the RV would be in constant communication with the roads and it would undock and leave your home port at an appropriate hour to get you to your destination on time. Because the RV units and cars on the road are all sync’d up there could be slow 5 – 10 mph lanes dedicated to “RV Traffic”

I extended this line of thinking to be able to dock with hotels and other properties – gyms, friends RV’s, concert venues, the ideas are endless. Perhaps leading to the question amongst friends … “Where Are You Docking Tonight?” and they can say it with all sincerity.

Oh … and There Will Be Jobs

For the foreseeable future there will be jobs to build, maintain and develop the vehicles, the infrastructure, and the services that surround the VaaS Experience.

Humans will still be actively involved in the development of many aspects of autonomous vehicles. Some of these will be transitioned to more service oriented tasks.

And, perhaps, as Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak predicts humans will become pets of the robots we will build … including the vehicles we will develop.

For the near term there is still a lot of work to be done. There is a lot of HUMAN work to be done. Including:

  • Logistics – Who can order a VaaS? Will there be age limits? Where will vehicles go when they aren’t needed (both immediately and when they need to be de-commissioned)? Who will pay for the storage of vehicles that are out of service?
  • Ownership – Will the concept of owning a vehicle still exist?
  • Priority Access – Will people be able to pay a premium for faster service? Or for a different kind of car? Uber does this now with “surge pricing”
  • Human Factors Engineering – How will automobiles change when there is no need for a steering wheel? Can more of the vehicle “space” be used? How to engineer a sleeper car? A Game Car? A <fill-in-the-blank> vehicle for whatever you can imagine?
  • Economics of the markets servicing the autonomous vehicle industry. This will be significant. The way automobiles are purchased, provisioned, serviced, etc.
  • Government RegulationsThere will be taxes in the future. There will be taxes levied to cover the costs of these vehicles, the roadways, the service industry that surrounds them and so much more.
  • Computer Programming – Currently humans have the upper hand here. Eventually processing speed as well as creativity will be outsourced to faster and more adaptable computing systems.
  • System Design – Roads, docking ports, working hours, on-call provisioning, payment systems, vehicle safety, etc.
  • Maintaining Roads and Bridges – At present there are a lot of human specific actions needed to maintain the roads. This may change rapidly, but not for a little while.
  • Much, much more … I’m only skimming the surface here.

Over time some of these (and many other) tasks will be automated and go to the next closest robot. This is not a doom-and-gloom post. This is a reality post. The reality is … Autonomous Vehicles are coming.

I embrace my robot overlords and here are three scenarios I envision.

Next Stop: Submarines and Space Ships. I’m ready.

image image

Image Credits: McViker, ROV.org, sportku


clip_image001Jeff is an expert in the Enterprise Content Management industry. He brings over 20 years of Channel Sales, Partner Marketing and Alliance expertise to audiences around the world in speaking engagements and via his writing. He has worked for Microsoft, Kodak, and is currently the Chief Evangelist at K2.
Tweet him
@jshuey or connect on LinkedIn, Facebook, or Google+ He is active in the Microsoft Partner Community and is the co-founder and President of the IAMCP Seattle chapter.


He is a contributing author to
Entrepreneur, Elite Daily, Yahoo, US News and to the Personal Branding Blog.

Tuesday, June 2, 2015

Countdown to WPC – 39 Days of a Tip a Day

image The Microsoft Worldwide Partner Conference (WPC) is taking place in Orlando, FL on July 12-17.

I am counting down the days with a Tip a Day until the event starts. I’m starting today on June 2nd 2015 with 39 days to go. I can use your help. My goal is to make these 39 Tips ready for you to Tweet (or repost to Facebook).

image.
I’m using ClicktoTweet to make it easy for you to share these as tweets.

Tip 37

Tip #37 – Women in Technology are very active at #WPC15 – Follow #IAMCPWIT & see https://mspartner.microsoft.com/en/us/Pages/community/WIT.aspx

Click to Tweet

Tip 38

Tip #38 – If you are a First Time Attendee to #WPC15 be aware that you have people ready to help you navigate the event.

Click to Tweet

Tip 39

Start Planning for your WPC Experience. Make a list of the sessions you want to attend. #WPC15 http://sessions.digitalwpc.com/sessions 

Click to Tweet

Bonus Tip 40
(for June 1st)

Register Today. If you haven’t registered yet … now is the time. https://mspartner.microsoft.com/en/us/pages/wpc/registration.aspx #WPC15

Click to Tweet

What Can Your Expect?

A few things I’ll be covering include First Time Attendees (FTA’s), Sessions, Tracks, Speakers, Keynotes, the value of the International Association of Microsoft Channel Partners (IAMCP) organization, IAMCP Women in Technology (WIT), the WPC Connect tool, the YouthSpark Hub, and the always popular WPC Charity Golf event, and perhaps a little about the parties.

I’m also going to have Bonus Time Posts that will start the first day of the WPC and run thru the end of the event.

image

What Can We Do Together?

If you are looking to do more with SharePoint, Office 365 and Azure I’d like to connect with you. My company, K2, is honored to be recognized as a finalist in the 2015 Office and SharePoint Application Development Partner of the Year awards. In conjunction with the $153M investment from Francisco Partners K2 is ready to help customers around the world to maximize their investments in Microsoft technologies.

If you have any questions drop a comment here or contact me at any of the following options.

Image Credits: Microsoft Corporation

clip_image001Jeff is an expert in the Enterprise Content Management industry. He brings over 20 years of Channel Sales, Partner Marketing and Alliance expertise to audiences around the world in speaking engagements and via his writing. He has worked for Microsoft, Kodak, and is currently the Chief Evangelist at K2.

Tweet him
@jshuey or connect on LinkedIn, Facebook, or Google+ He is active in the Microsoft Partner Community and is the co-founder and President of the IAMCP Seattle chapter.

He is a contributing author to
Entrepreneur, Elite Daily, Yahoo, US News and to the Personal Branding Blog.

Tuesday, May 26, 2015

Living in the Age of the Goldfish Response Rate


Recent studies have shown that humans have reached a new low.

Humans now have an attention span that rivals a goldfish.

Goldfish supposedly have a memory of less than 10 seconds. Humans seem to have bested that with one study showing humans have an 8 second attention span.

Yes, we have beaten the lowly goldfish at something else.

What Can You Do in 9 Seconds?

Well, if these studies are to be believed you better learn to market, sell, service and support everything and everyone … all within 9 seconds.

A Microsoft study highlights the deteriorating attention span of humans, saying it has fallen from 12 seconds in 2000 to eight seconds

Smartphones are making humans subject to the whims of a passing squirrel. In this study – researchers have discovered that the human attention span has dropped by 50% in 15 years.
Fact Checking --- It’s a good thing. Another study has shown that goldfish can actually remember things for 3 and even 5 months.
While I think I know a few people with a Goldfish Attention Span Problems (GASP) I’m pretty sure most humans can pay attention for at least twice this long.
  • What’s your experience?
  • Do you know people with extremely short attention spans?
  • How do you get through to them? Do you adapt or do they?
Share your thoughts here in the comments.

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Jeff is an expert in the Enterprise Content Management industry. He brings over 20 years of Channel Sales, Partner Marketing and Alliance expertise to audiences around the world in speaking engagements and via his writing. He has worked for Microsoft, Kodak, and is currently the Chief Evangelist at K2.
Tweet him @jshuey or connect on LinkedIn, Facebook, or Google+ He is active in the Microsoft Partner Community and is the co-founder and President of the IAMCP Seattle chapter.

He is a contributing author to Entrepreneur, Elite Daily, Yahoo, US News and to the Personal Branding Blog.

Friday, May 22, 2015

Generational Problem Solving

During a Tweetjam with the always insightful Christian Buckley where the topic of conversation was The Use and Future of Groups within Office 365. It got me thinking about a quote from Albert Einstein. That quote is simple, elegant and applicable to this Group conversation.image

"We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them.”

The Modern Tech Equivalent
As espoused the host of the Tweetjam and retweeted by the equally prescient Marc D Anderson
image
Tech rarely solves a collaboration challenge.
It's a tool as part of the effort.
#collabtalk

Thanks to Christian and all the people that contributed to the Tweetjam. A complete listing will be available shortly. When it is I will update this post with a link. In the meantime you can check the Twubs site for the hashtag #CollabTalk or click on the image below. image
The Future Looks Bright
I’m optimistic that the challenges and problems introduced by the current technical and business platforms and philosophies are being looked at by a new set of eyes. Some of these eyes are from the up and coming (and now dominant workforce) of The Millennials. We are also begining to be a few Gen Z’s that will have a direct impact on the way the technology and business rules will morph in the coming decade.
Remember:
The Problem Cannot Be Solved By The People That Created It.
What do you think?
  • Can problems be resolved by the people that created them?
  • What will need to change to make change permanent?
  • Will problems will the next generation create for their kids?
Drop a comment here and let us all know.

clip_image001

Jeff is an expert in the Enterprise Content Management industry. He brings over 20 years of Channel Sales, Partner Marketing and Alliance expertise to audiences around the world in speaking engagements and via his writing. He has worked for Microsoft, Kodak, and is currently the Chief Evangelist at K2.
Tweet him @jshuey or connect on LinkedIn, Facebook, or Google+ He is active in the Microsoft Partner Community and is the co-founder and President of the IAMCP Seattle chapter.
He is a contributing author to Entrepreneur, Elite Daily, Yahoo, US News and to the Personal Branding Blog.




Thursday, May 21, 2015

Fish Outta Water (FOW) in People Management

image Like the kids game Marco Polo there are times in business where you've gotta call fish outta water.

Applying FOW Thinking at Work

Some people just aren't suited for their role and no amount of intellectual horsepower will make up for a lack of passion, conviction or willingness to take to the time understand the business. This may seem a bit harsh and it is, but the business deserves everyone's best efforts.

When this happens you hope the person recognizes it and calls "FOW" on themselves.

But, when they don't, won't or can't ... management needs to step in.

Have you Ever ...

  • Called Fish Outta Water on yourself?
  • Called it on someone else? Or at least wanted to?
  • What were the results? Did you find it to be better? Did the person thank you?
    .
Note the the Reader: This is a flashback post from 2010. It was stuck in my drafts folder. I'm publishing today as a #TBT

Updating for Today: In honor of the Foo Fighters being the last band on David Letterman I'm linking to another post I wrote called - Is Someone Getting the Best of You?

clip_image001
Jeff is an expert in the Enterprise Content Management industry. He brings over 20 years of Channel Sales, Partner Marketing and Alliance expertise to audiences around the world in speaking engagements and via his writing. He has worked for Microsoft, Kodak, and is currently the Chief Evangelist at K2.

Tweet him @jshuey or connect on LinkedIn, Facebook, or Google+ He is active in the Microsoft Partner Community and is the co-founder and President of the IAMCP Seattle chapter.
He is a contributing author to Entrepreneur, Elite Daily, Yahoo, US News and to the Personal Branding Blog.
 

Saturday, May 9, 2015

Notes from the Trails - Microsoft Ignite Book Launch

Another Notes from the Trails I shot during the ride this morning.

We launched a book ... did you get your signed copy at the K2 Appit booth? If not ... I might be able to help. If you can't wait ... get your free copy to download to your computer right now here: http://improveIT.how

Just to be clear: I'm just one author of several.The Webtrends team made this happen. I'm proud to have been selected to work with the team to bring this to fruition.

I look forward to your feedback on the book. Thanks again to the Webtrends team of Jean-Marc Krikorian, Bob Schnyder and Loren Johnson.They are the brains behind pulling this together. Also, Mark Miller is the publishing wiz.

Also, thanks and congrats to the talented team of co-authors --- Karuana Gatimu, Heather Newman, Simeon Cathey, Kanwal Khipple, Sadalit Van Buren, Susan Hanley, Christian Buckley, Natalie Hardwicke, Richard Harbridge, Antoinette Houston, Agnes Molnar, Jason Schnur, Naomi Moneypenney, and Kunaal Kapoor.

It was an honor to work with you. I'm looking forward to the next time we get to work together.

I hope you enjoy this video. They are fun to shoot and I always enjoy the comments I receive. If you feel so inclined drop a comment here. Or just tell me what you think next time I see you.

Also, I take requests. If you want me to talk about something on my Notes from the Trails videos let me know.

See you on the trails!

clip_image001
Jeff is an expert in the Enterprise Content Management industry. He brings over 20 years of Channel Sales, Partner Marketing and Alliance expertise to audiences around the world in speaking engagements and via his writing. He has worked for Microsoft, Kodak, and is currently the Chief Evangelist at K2.

Tweet him @jshuey or connect on LinkedIn, Facebook, or Google+ He is active in the Microsoft Partner Community and is the co-founder and President of the IAMCP Seattle chapter.
He is a contributing author to Entrepreneur, Elite Daily, Yahoo, US News and to the Personal Branding Blog.